A Non-Muslim’s Guide to Ramadan | Humour, Guide, Educational

Hello, and Ramadan Kareem to all muslims out there!

Here, in the Islamic capital, Saudi Arabia, Ramadan started a couple days ago, and my non-muslim friends kept asking questions about it, so I decided to just write this post.

Don’t take this too seriously, as this is supposed to be a little humorous because I’ll give a little a day in my life, but I’ll also give you guys actual information about Ramadan.

Think of it as a non-muslim’s guide to Ramadan.

A NON-MUSLIM' S1

I’m gonna give you a little overview of what Ramadan is and other things like that.

But first, I want to share a little video I found on youtube a couple days ago. I got this idea randomly while I was in the shower, so I went and googled it to see if anyone else got to it before me, and so it seems. This sweet girl, explains a lot about what Ramadan is and all things surrounding it.

WHAT IS RAMADAN?

This is kinda the mother of all questions, so I’m tackling it first.

According to google, Ramadan is the ninth month of the Islamic calendar. It is a time when Muslims around the world focus on prayer, fasting, giving to charity, and religious devotion.

But from my definition, I would say that Ramadan is the month where we all get closer to god, and try to get our lives back on the right track.

Ramadan is a month where families get closer, faith grows stronger, and Allah forgives our sins.

It’s much more than just a month. It’s holy.

WHEN IS RAMADAN?

Ramadan always comes on the same day, but that’s on the lunar calendar. On the Western calendar that we widely use, it differs every year.

It comes approximately 10/11 days earlier every year.

WHY DO WE FAST?

Muslims mainly fast because it’s one of the 5 pillars of Islam.

But we also fast because fasting is an exercise in self-restraint and control. It’s seen as a way to physically and spiritually detoxify by kicking impulses like morning coffee, smoking and midday snacking.

HOW DOES ONE FAST?

Muslim fast by not eating, drinking, swearing, getting involved in any sexual activities, and smoking from sunrise (Fajr) till sundown (Maghreb).

Muslims usually eat right before Fajr to fill up their stomachs for the day ahead. This meal is called Suhur.

We also break out fast by eating a large meal with our families at sundown, called Iftar or Futoor.

THE END OF RAMADAN

At the end of this holy month, we celebrate with Eid!

People dress up and go to pray very early in the morning. It’s really one of the best things about Ramadan.

Just being able to celebrate this amazing ay with family and all, it just puts a smile on my face.

TRY IT!

You can fast with a fellow muslim without it being a part of a religion or anything. Just show them that you care.

I actually saw a post on The Muslim Times a while ago about this woman who started a fast with your fellow muslims campaign, and I think that’s just an amazing idea!

You can check out the campaign at www.FastWithMuslims.com

I also read post over at My Microbes and Me about her experience fasting, and I found it really interesting, so go check it out!

MAKE RAMADAN EASIER FOR YOU

For all the people fasting, I recommend you check out Tazzie Dee‘s post, where she wrote a couple of hacks for Ramadan fasting.

I also read a post on GAYA about eating fruits for Iftar. And I think that it could be helpful for a lot of you!

A DAY IN MY LIFE DURING RAMADAN

For the past couple years, Ramadan has come during my summer holidays, which is really lucky for me because I can sleep in.

I usually sleep around 5 or 6am, so I sleep in until around noon or so. I wake up and almost drink my coffee, then remember that it’s Ramadan. UGH!

I go clean my room and everything. Read. Watch TV. Pray. Read Qur’an. Repeat.

That goes on until around 7pm (that’s when sundown is for me, it differs by the country). I go and wait for the azan (the calling for Maghreb prayer).

When it finally is time to eat, I go all out. I admit, it’s not healthy but I stuff my stomach to it’s full capacity.

I then really regret eating so much… Meh, food is really good, so its worth it.

I then just it down and watch TV, write blog posts, and maybe exercise.

Then I go to sleep and the cycle keeps going.

 

I hope you enjoyed this post and learned something new from it! I really recommend you try fasting just to see the experience, its truly is a humbling act!


Much love, Rawan❤ …

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